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In everything the child of God does, God’s glory is always first and last on his mind. Paul said, “Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God” (1 Cor. 10:31). According to Vines, “glory” (Gr. doxa) “primarily signifies an opinion, estimate, and hence, the honour resulting from a good opinion.” To this thought Thayer adds, “magnificence, excellence, preeminence, and dignity.” It involves recognizing God as God and treating him as God (cf. Rom. 1:21) because God’s glory is more important than man’s glory. This is why the Savior said, “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven” (Mat. 5:16).

When sinners analyze the motives of Christians what do they see? Hopefully, they will see that each one truly desires to direct others to God and His Son. It is not worldly favor that will advance the love of God, but only the cross (1 Cor. 1:18).

Think about the attitude of the apostle Paul and how desperately it is needed amongst Christians today: “But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world” (Gal. 6:14). Christians are called “to glory and virtue” (2 Pet. 1:3). That glory is not personal, but the Lord’s own glory. It is manifested by virtue or moral goodness—lives that reflect humility, obedience, and praise to God by leading others to glorify Him out of love (1 Pet. 4:11; Eph. 3:21).

Derrick Coble
Sparta, TN
BulletinDigest.com

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