January 2015, Vol. 34, No. 1

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Remember Who You Are

posted on February 6, 2018

[528 words]

If you are familiar with the story The Lion King, you know the critical point of Simba’s life. He was a young lion cub destined to become the next King. But due to some tragic events, including the death of his father, and the evil influence of his wicked uncle he had left his homeland to grow up in a distant land. True, it was a land filled with happiness and joy, but there was something missing. It wasn’t home. Simba searched and longed for the perfect place to live, the perfect place where he belonged. As time passed, he wrestled with the calling to return to his homeland and become the king he was meant to be. While struggling with that decision, he one day heard the “voice” of his father: “Simba, you have forgotten me. You have forgotten who you are, and so have forgotten me. Look inside yourself, Simba. You are more than what you have become. Remember who you are. You are my son.” Remembering that he was the son of the king was the critical turning point in Simba ‘s life, and in the future of the pride of lions. He did go back and became what he was meant to become.

Remembering who we are is a critical point in our life, too. As Christians, we are children of the King of kings (Colossians 1:13 ). Sometimes events happen to us that influence us to leave our homeland (death of a loved one, accidents, a job change, neglect, lust for wealth, boredom, yielding to a sinful lifestyle, divorce, health issues, etc.). Whatever those events may be, the reality is that we are no longer at home, even if we still live at the same address. We may even be in a pig pen. Sometimes we have people to help us come to our senses and return home (like Nala in The Lion King). Sometimes we have to come to our senses all by ourselves (like the Prodigal Son in Jesus’ parable – Luke 15). Either way, the key to making a good decision about returning home is to remember.

Our lives can get messed up big time, but if we will allow ourselves to remember the Father ‘s house, there is hope (“Remember the height from which you have fallen!” – Revelation 2:5). In the distant land we are not who we were meant to be. It may be fun for a time, but all the while there is a nagging emptiness in our conscience knowing that we are not where we need to be, urging us to return home. When we do return home to the Father’s house, we can once again be on track to becoming what we were meant to be.

We need to remember that we are the children of the King. As such, there are expectations and responsibilities, and the standards are set high. Children of the King have high moral and ethical expectations (Colossians 3:1-17). We have great commands (Mark 12:29-31) and a great commission (Matthew 28:19-20). It is imperative that we “remember who we are,” and work to become it.

Joe Chesser
via Jackson Church of Christ
Jackson, MO

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